spectrum

Recursos de programación de spectrum
As individuals, we use time series data in everyday life all the time; If you’re trying to improve your health, you may track how many steps you take daily, and relate that to your body weight or size over time to understand how well you’re doing. This is clearly a small-scale example, but on the other end of the spectrum, large-scale time series use cases abound in our current technological landscape. Be it tracking the price of a stock or cryptocurrency that changes every millisecond, performance and health metrics of a video streaming application, sensors for reading temperature, pressure and humidity, or the information generated from millions of IoT devices. Modern digital applications require collecting, storing, and analyzing time series data at extreme scale, and with performance that a relational database simply cannot provide. We have all seen very creative solutions built to work around this problem, but as throughput needs increase, scaling them becomes a major challenge. To get the job done, developers end up landing, transforming, and moving data around repeatedly, using multiple components pipelined together. Looking at these solutions really feels like looking at Rube Goldberg machines. It’s staggering to see how complex architectures become in order to satisfy the needs of these workloads. Most importantly, all of this is something that needed to be built, managed, and maintained, and it still doesn’t meet very high scale and performance needs. Many time series applications can generate enormous volumes of data. One common example here is video streaming. The act of delivering high quality video content is a very complex process. Understanding load latency, video frame drops, and user activity is something that needs to happen at massive scale and in real time. This process alone can generate several GBs of data every second, while easily running hundreds of thousands, sometimes over a million, queries per hour. A relational database certainly isn’t the right choice here. Which is exactly why we built Timestream at AWS. Timestream started out by decoupling data ingestion, storage, and query such that each can scale independently. The design keeps each sub-system simple, making it easier to achieve unwavering reliability, while also eliminating scaling bottlenecks, and reducing the chances of correlated system failures which becomes more important as the system grows. At the same time, in order to manage overall growth, the system is cell based – rather than scale the system as a whole, we segment the system into multiple smaller copies of itself so that these cells can be tested at full scale, and a system problem in one cell can’t affect activity in any of the other cells. In this session, I will introduce the problem of time-series, I will take a look at some architectures that have been used it the past to work around the problem, and I will then introduce Amazon Timestream, a purpose-built database to process and analyze time-series data at scale. In this session I will describe the time-series problem, discuss the architecture of Amazon Timestream, and demo how it can be used to ingest and process time-series data at scale as a fully managed service. I will also demo how it can be easily integrated with open source tools like Apache Flink or Grafana.
Continuamos la serie evolucionando la aplicación Cloud Friendly de capítulos anteriores para conseguir una aplicación Cloud Resilient. Revisaremos el diseño general de nuestra aplicación, realizaremos testeo de fallos proactivamente e incluiremos herramientas de monitorización y de métricas. Si quieres ver los capítulos anteriores: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2yjEVbRSX7URtV8vy5gyxfTgz08yDz77 ¿Quién es el ponente? Javier Serrano. Me encanta la tecnología y la programación desde que tuve un ZX Spectrum+ en mis manos de pequeño. En los últimos años he estado trabajando con arquitecturas orientadas a microservicios, orientadas a eventos y definiendo sistemas Cloud Native. Defensor del desarrollo ágil, del software libre y de DevOps.
Continuamos la serie partiendo de la aplicación Cloud Friendly del segundo capítulo de la serie y la desplegaremos sobre AWS aplicando las mejores prácticas DevOps sobre dicha plataforma. Además, usaremos herramientas estándar y OpenSource como GitLab y Terraform, pero también emplearemos las herramientas propias de AWS. ¿Quién es el ponente? Javier Serrano. Me encanta la tecnología y la programación desde que tuve un ZX Spectrum+ en mis manos de pequeño. En los últimos años he estado trabajando con arquitecturas orientadas a microservicios, orientadas a eventos y definiendo sistemas Cloud Native. Defensor del desarrollo ágil, del software libre y de DevOps.
Continuamos la serie partiendo de la aplicación Cloud Friendly de capítulos anteriores sobre la que incluiremos una funcionalidad adicional pero construida en su totalidad en Serversless usando herramientas propias de AWS: dynamoDB, AWS Lambda, AWS API Gateway y Cognito. ¿Quiénes son los ponentes? Javier Serrano. Me encanta la tecnología y la programación desde que tuve un ZX Spectrum+ en mis manos de pequeño. En los últimos años he estado trabajando con arquitecturas orientadas a microservicios, orientadas a eventos y definiendo sistemas Cloud Native. Defensor del desarrollo ágil, del software libre y de DevOps. Noelia Martín. Ingeniero Superior en Telecomunicaciones. Inicié mi carrera programando servicios hasta llegar al mundo de las APIs. Actualmente trabajo en Paradigma en el departamento de Arquitectura dentro del área de API Management y gobierno intentando promover las buenas prácticas en diseño y desarrollo de las APIs.
Continuamos la serie "From 0 to Cloud" partiendo de la aplicación Cloud Friendly del segundo capítulo de la serie (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5-jl9uI0x0&t=2s), la desplegaremos sobre Azure aplicando las mejores prácticas DevOps sobre dicha plataforma y usaremos herramientas estándar y OpenSource como GitLab y Terraform. Repositorio: https://github.com/paradigmadigital/from-0-to-cloud-azure Presentación: http://paradig.ma/from-0-to-cloud-azure ¿Quiénes son los ponentes? Javier Serrano. Me encanta la tecnología y la programación desde que tuve un ZX Spectrum+ en mis manos de pequeño. En los últimos años he estado trabajando con arquitecturas orientadas a microservicios, orientadas a eventos y definiendo sistemas Cloud Native. Defensor del desarrollo ágil, del software libre y de DevOps. Rubén Villar. Mente inquieta y curiosa que ha encontrado en la tecnología un filón inagotable de retos y aprendizaje. Actualmente, estoy inmerso en el desarrollo de arquitecturas ágiles y acompañando a las empresas en el despliegue de soluciones en la nube.
En la siguiente parte de este ciclo de webinars partiremos de un monolito desplegado on-premise en un servidor de aplicaciones que adaptaremos para que ejecute en Cloud, separaremos Front de Back, los dockerizaremos y los llevaremos a una plataforma que nos permita disponer de una aplicación Cloud Friendly que cumpla con lo que vimos en el primer capítulo de la serie. ¿Quiénes son los ponentes? Javier Serrano. Me encanta la tecnología y la programación desde que tuve un ZX Spectrum+ en mis manos de pequeño. En los últimos años he estado trabajando con arquitecturas orientadas a microservicios, orientadas a eventos y definiendo sistemas Cloud Native. Defensor del desarrollo ágil, del software libre y de DevOps. Carlos Tauroni. Entusiasta y especialista de tecnologías frontales. Me gusta investigar y probar herramientas que el desarrollo web pone hoy en día a nuestra disposición para sacarle el mejor partido a cada una de ellas.
En este webinar veremos cuáles son los pasos para cambiar una aplicación monolítica y basada en tecnología antigua hasta convertirla en una aplicación Cloud Ready. Además, evolucionaremos la arquitectura y actualizaremos la tecnología para conseguir una aplicación Cloud Native. Por último, aplicaremos diversas prácticas DevOps, sobre todo orientadas a la automatización. Todo desde un punto de vista agnóstico. ¿Quién es el ponente? Javier Serrano Me encanta la tecnología y la programación desde que tuve un ZX Spectrum+ en mis manos de pequeño. En los últimos años he estado trabajando con arquitecturas orientadas a microservicios, orientadas a eventos y definiendo sistemas Cloud Native. Defensor del desarrollo ágil, del software libre y de DevOps.
Los beneficios del podcasting son muchos, también en el desarrollo de software. Primero quiero contarte la historia de Mario. Trabajaba en una empresa de creación de software, su pasión desde que le regalaron un Spectrum. Mario escuchaba las noticias en la radio. Siempre. Cuando iba y venía, cuando subía y bajaba. Quería estar bien informado. Cambiaba el dial, conocía la hora exacta de los programas que mejor le informaban. Durante años repitió este procedimiento. Ocurrió algo singular...
Software Developer & Architect at The Practical Developer Moisés is a Software Developer and Architect, and the author of the blog ThePracticalDeveloper.com and the book Learn Microservices with Spring Boot. He has been developing software since he was a kid, when his parents bought him a Sinclair Spectrum ZX and he started playing around with code. Since then, he has been involved in development, design, and architecture, and has worked in waterfall and agile organizations. His career started in Málaga, where he worked for big corporations and also small startups. He moved to Amsterdam in 2015 and is now working as Solutions Architect for a project based on Java and Spring Boot Microservices. Moisés has learned to be a pragmatic developer and architect and likes sharing his observations with others.
¿Conoces la Abadía del Crimen? La abadía es un juego de 8-bit (para spectrum y CPC) que se convirtió en el primer juego RPG en 3D (2.5D) en 1987. Este juego es una maravilla desde un punto de vista tecnológico: en solo menos de 120k es capaz de almacenar el sonido, las imágenes, toda la lógica del programa y los datos . ¿Conseguiste terminar el juego sin ayuda? No conozco a nadie que se lo haya pasado sin ayuda. Es uno de los juegos mas complicados que se han desarrollado, como unas 10x o 100x comparado con la venganza de montezuma de Atari. En la charla contaremos como diseñamos y construimos una AI capaz de jugar solo y aprender a completar el juego. https://www.koliseo.com/events/commit-2018/r4p/5630471824211968/agenda #/5734118109216768/5664208255451136